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Articles of Interest

Abundant evidence of the Kumeyaay

This gem of a trail follows a narrow path between the lake and Lake Wohlford Road. The path is partially open and shaded underneath oak canopies where there are regular views of the lake as well as benches for relaxation. Coast live oaks, Engelmann oaks, and rock formations are plentiful. Interesting boulders and rock slabs are pigmented with yellows and reds of the different types of algae and fungus that make up lichen.

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Viejas Casino & Resort Earns Two More Guinness World Records

The Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians in Alpine, California is proud of their heritage and history. Since the beginning development of the Viejas Casino & Resort, the annual birthday ceremony has always been a big deal and a “thank you” to their patrons.  

Read more: Viejas Casino & Resort Earns Two More Guinness World Records

San Diego State students petition to have 'Aztecs' name changed

The Washington Redskins and owner Dan Snyder seems to have no interest in changing their nickname which is offensive to the Native American culture, however that doesn’t mean that other teams in sports might not be proactive and go about it themselves. Such as the San Diego State Aztecs of the collegiate ranks, for example.  

Read more: San Diego State students petition to have 'Aztecs' name changed

Video: Columbus Day: How Is This Still a Thing?

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver recently asked a question we’ve been asking for years—how is Columbus Day still a thing?

Read more: Video: Columbus Day: How Is This Still a Thing?

Ninth Circuit Court Panel Reaffirms 'Discovery and Conquest'

On August 27, 2014, a three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals handed down a split (2-1) decision in the case White v. University of California. The case involves a dispute regarding two 9,000 + year old ancestral remains which the Kumeyaay Cultural Repatriation Committee (KCRC) considers to be the skeletal remains of Kumeyaay ancestors.  

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals panel termed them the “La Jolla remains.” The Kumyeyaay ancestral remains were first “discovered” in 1976 during an archaeological excavation on the land where the UC San Diego Chancellor’s residence is located within the original territory of the Kumeyaay Nation.  

Read more: Ninth Circuit Court Panel Reaffirms 'Discovery and Conquest'

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